Myths of foot care

Did you know people in some cultures are offended if the soles of your feet ever face them? Because feet are such a vital part of our body, many societies, communities and even families have developed diverse forms of traditions and home remedies surrounding feet. Some are very valid; others are mere myths and misconceptions. One good example is Athlete’s Foot.

Athlete’s Foot creeps up on men and women, athletes and couch potatoes. Cleaning your feet carefully with lots of soap won’t protect you in public spaces, such as swimming pool showers. The only way to protect your feet is to keep them dry and away from any infected areas, including a friend’s used towel or shoes.

The most dangerous misconception is that Athlete’s Foot will simply disappear on its own after a few days or weeks; therefore antifungal creams and pills might be necessary to fight the germs in most cases. Although it may be treated successfully, it can quickly return if you don’t engage in preventative measures like wearing socks made from synthetic materials.

Find out more: http://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/athletes-foot-myths

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Foot fashion and foot health

Everyone knows skirts go well with stilettos, but did you know hammertoes, calluses and bunions are frequent companions as well?

Wearing uncomfortable shoes can have serious consequences and may even require surgical treatment; however, anyone who believes “beauty knows no pain” should at least try to prevent potential injuries. Always have a second pair of comfortable shoes around, in case you are confronted with a cobble stone street or are doing daily chores. Consider reducing the heel height to one or two inches and ask your sales associate for chunky and kitten heels.

Fashion lovers should regularly visit a podiatrist to screen for insidious foot and ankle deformities. Check out remedies for pain, such as toe spacers and bunion pads. Don’t let style destroy the natural beauty of your feet. And don’t forget: you won’t need heels at the next pool party anyway.

Find out more: http://www.dmc.org/dwhfoothealth

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How to prevent foot odor

Summer is approaching and temperatures are rising. Who wouldn’t want to cool down by taking off their shoes in the house or garden? Well, family and friends with a sensitive nose might urge you not to do so.

But how does foot odor start, and how can it be prevented? There are two primary causes. The first one is genetic and depends on the number of sweat glands, which produce moisture. The second cause, hygiene, can be controlled – and should be. Bad hygiene causes bacteria that, in combination with moisture, result in common foot odor. Warm temperatures and footwear prevents evaporation and will contribute to foot odor by providing the perfect environment for bacteria to reproduce. Additional causes include could be stress, medication and alcohol/drugs.

Preventing foot odor is feasible though: wash your feet properly on a daily basis, use and alternate moisture-preventing shoes and socks and keep your feet as dry as possible. Alternative measures include the use of specific creams and powders. Ask us for the treatments that will best fit your feet.

Find out more: http://www.footvitals.com/skin/foot-odor.html

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Public area foot health

Its summer time and everyone wants to go to the local water park. Everyone is barefoot in the locker room and by the pool. Keeping your feet healthy is important to help prevent the spreading of athlete’s foot in public areas. Athlete’s foot is a common fungal infection and can be spread by skin particles left on towels, shoes, or floors. Taking care of your own feet will reduce the possibility of getting Athlete’s foot yourself and spreading it to others in public areas.

Healthy feet start with good hygiene. However, good foot hygiene involves a lot more than simply washing your feet during a shower or bath. The Institute for Preventative Foot Health suggests a three part process involving daily foot care, toenail care, and daily foot inspection. The process can help make your feet happy and healthy. For more information on how to use this process and keeping your feet healthy, visit http://www.ipfh.org/foot-care-essentials/how-to-practice-good-foot-hygiene/

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How to prevent foot blisters

Are you a frequent runner or simply an active person? If so, chances are you’ve had a blister before and it was not a good experience. Blisters occur when there is friction against the foot. This forms a space between the layers of skin and fluid seeps into the space. They can be caused by anything from poorly fitted running shoes to wet feet caused by non-absorbing socks.

There is more to treating a blister than simply putting a band aid on and ignoring it. Improper care can lead to infection or other severe consequences. Minimizing friction is important when trying to prevent blisters. It is important to have the proper sock
s, shoes, and orthotics to prevent blisters from occurring. Having the right ointment to treat existing blisters is important as well. For more information on how to prevent and care for blisters, visit http://greatist.com/fitness/runners-guide-prevent-treat-blisters#

Runners

Many people try to ignore foot pain. But did you know that foot pain could be causing the pain in your back, knees, and hips too? Our bodies are like a chain and if a link in that chain is out of position then it affects the entire body. When it is painful to walk our normal way, we instinctively change the way we walk. Changing your walking pattern can also affect the whole chain of the lower body – from the ankle, to the knees, to the hip, and then to the lower back.

The way all of those joints move together is changed when foot pain or deformity causes a change in the way you walk. Ligaments and tendons can be stressed beyond their normal range, arthritis can set in, and cartilage in the joints can wear down. Other conditions such as flat feet, bunions, and heel pain can cause problems in your back, knees, and hips as well.

Find out more: http://www.foothealthfacts.org/content.aspx?id=1386

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Sprained Ankle Management & Care

Ankle sprains are a very common injury and can happen during many different activities. Whether it happens while playing a sport or simply walking around the block, ankle sprains need proper care and management. Signs of a sprained ankle can include pain or tenderness, swelling, bruising, inability to walk, or stiffness. To treat sprained ankles, many doctors suggest using the RICE approach – Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation.

When caring for a sprained ankle, it is important to rest your ankle by not walking on it, limit weight bearing, and use crutches if necessary. Make sure to ice your sprained ankle to keep the swelling down. Compression can help control swelling and support your injury. Wrapping your ankle is a great way to avoid swelling and bruising. Elevating your ankle above the level of your heart will also help prevent the swelling from getting worse and will help reduce bruising. For more information about managing and caring for a sprained ankle, visit

http://www.aofas.org/footcaremd/how-to/foot-injury/Pages/How%20to%20Care%20for%20a%20Sprained%20Ankle.aspx
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